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AvianhelloJE -click on the pic for a larger view-

I absolutely *adore* letterpress.  I love how clean it is, how it embraces white space, how it celebrates the simplicity of image, paper and ink . . . sometimes graphic, sometimes vintage, sometimes avante garde, but always infused with this sense of refinement, class, and unparalleled luxuriousness. 

I don't have a press or any of the equipment needed to create it . . . so . . . I have to settle for petting and cooing over it when I walk into a fine stationery store . . . and for faking it.  In the studio.  With rubbah. *chuckle*

The photo above doesn't really do the finished piece justice–the colors are richer.  I'm so tickled it turned out as lovely as it did!  There was a lot of mucking about in the studio trying to figure out the right combination (which is half the fun, of course, of trying to see if you can make something work).  But, I finally cracked it.

  • a|s Bristol Paper has just enough texture, yet still smooth enough for stamping, and that slightly off-white color to project the look of those fine Italian milled papers I love so much
  • Simple images yield the best results; avoid super finely detailed images (rubber isn't as rigid as the metal printing blocks used in letterpress, so you have to allow for the natural "give" in rubber)
  • Because Bristol has a slightly textured and absorbant/highly porous surface, you'll achieve the best impressions by inking the stamp with a sponge dauber, as opposed to inking directly from the ink pad.

Golly gee, I love the results!!! *arms wrapped 'round self, deep chortling*

I'm finally starting to feel better, after a week long battle with a massive head-cold–one of the worst I've had in years! Ugh!  Being heavily medicated, or otherwise dead to the world in a Nyquil coma, definitely impedes one's ability to produce anything brilliant.

Can't wait to feel 100% normal (and brilliant) again! Heh, heh, heh!

•••••

All stamp images, inks, and papers by/from A Muse Studio unless otherwise noted.

Stamp Sets:  Avian Notes, Just My Type (Hello), Woodgrain Background; Ink: Grass, Cherry, Bermuda; Paper:  Bristol, Cherry; Sponge Daubers; 3D Foam Adhesive

9 Comments
  1. Beautiful results Julie! One of my all-time favorites from you!

  2. It’s so beautiful, Julie…and I love the pretty color combination!! (That set is on my list)

  3. ah yes, genius again! I love it, love how clean it is, and i love the tip to use the ink daubers vs stamp to pad to ink.

  4. Hey, Cathy-
    Letterpress is a centuries old form of printing that involves simultaneously inking AND debossing type or image into the paper surface. When we stamp, we are leaving an “imprint” on the surface of the paper, but it is not debossed down into the paper, as it would be with letterpress. Here’s a brief history on Letterpress: A Brief History of Letterpress http://bit.ly/hZqbeo

    Italian milled papers, such as Fabriano Mediovalis, are preferred for Letterpress printing, due to the cotton texture and suitability for debossing.

    I did not do any debossing because I was working with rubber stamp imagery; it is not hard enough to deboss down into the paper. I was simply recreating the look by using Bristol Vellum Paper (which has a weight & texture somewhat like Fabriano, but smoother/more even), simple/crisp imagery, and making sure I had an ultra-smooth application of ink to the stamp by using sponge daubers.

    This link to an etsy shop shows some wonderful examples of letterpress: weheartpaper on Etsy http://etsy.me/hc04hd

  5. So sorry you haven’t been feeling well! At least you’ve kept it to yourself as your lovely card shows no signs of ill-health!
    Feel better soon!

  6. Brilliant! I am thinking perhaps I need to find some Nyquil so I can create things as amazing as yours :)

  7. Adorable as always!!

  8. Julie, pardon my cluelessness but can you please explain the difference between regular stamping and letterpress? How did you create this card? I love it! THX Cathy F

  9. ARGHHH!!! What, no tutorial? You tease us and don’t tell us HOW??? Come on, please!!

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